Beginning Monday, bans on travel from specific countries are over. The U.S. will allow in international travelers, but they must be vaccinated — with a few exceptions.
Here are some questions and answers about the changes:

WHAT ARE THE MAIN REQUIREMENTS?
All adult foreign nationals traveling to the U.S. must be fully vaccinated before boarding their flight. Like before, travelers will still have to show proof of a negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours of departure to the U.S.

EVERYONE NEEDS TO BE VACCINATED?
Yes, with some exceptions. Children under 18 don’t need to be vaccinated but they do need to take a COVID test. Kids 2 and younger are exempt from testing requirements.

WHAT ABOUT ADULTS WHO AREN’T VACCINATED?
Since half the world remains unvaccinated, and vaccine distribution has been so skewed to rich countries, the Biden administration is leaving a loophole for people who live in countries where vaccines are scarce.
Those exceptions will be applied “extremely narrowly” and require approval from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. There could also be a medical exception, with documentation from a doctor.


WHICH VACCINES WILL LET YOU IN?
Most but not all of them. Any COVID-19 vaccine approved for emergency use by the World Health Organization, which include the Pfizer, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines used in the U.S. as well as most used overseas, such as AstraZeneca and China’s Sinovac. The WHO is reviewing Sputnik but hasn’t approved it.

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